·          F-List [40 CFR 261.31] - The F-list (F001-F039), frequently referred to as the non-specific source list, contains spent solvents, electroplating wastes, wastes related to the production or treatment of chlorinated hydrocarbons, wood preserving wastes, and certain landfill leachates. Spent solvents on the F-list are designated by the codes F001, F002, F003, F004 and F005. The F001 code only applies to certain chlorinated solvents used in degreasing operations. Spent solvents are represented by the codes F002 through F005. Often, laboratories generate F-listed spent solvents. For example, in an organic prep lab, listed solvents such as methylene chloride and carbon disulfide are used in the extraction processes: methylene chloride wastes (e.g., waste extracts) are denoted by the code F002, and carbon disulfide wastes are denoted by the code F005. Note that there is a special "ignitability" provision for some of these wastes. This provision states that if an F-listed waste was originally listed for ignitability (solely), and that waste is no longer ignitable, then the waste is no longer a listed hazardous waste.  Special attention will be paid to F020, F021, F022, F023, F026, & F027 wastes in this category since only 1 quart of the (acute) F-listed waste noted in red can be accumulated in a satellite accumulation area at any one time. Also note that if a generator produces >1kg/month of F-listed waste noted in red must register as a large quantity generator. Containers that previously held F-listed waste noted in red must also be triple rinsed to meet RCRA empty standards.

·          K-List [40 CFR 261.32] - The K-list, frequently referred to as the specific source list, contains solid hazardous wastes from certain industries including, but not limited to, chemical manufacturing, ink formulating, petroleum refineries and metal smelting. Laboratories may generate K-listed waste if they accept waste samples from a K-listed industrial process. Lincoln University does not accept any material of this type so this is for information purposes only.
P-List [40 CFR 261.33(e)] - The P-list applies to unused, discarded, commercial chemical products with a sole-active ingredient on the P-list. In laboratories, the P-list is often assigned to expired chemicals or unused chemicals that are thought to be contaminated. For example, a container of carbon disulfide, that for some reason is thought to be contaminated, would be disposed of as P022 waste. The P-list can also be applied to discarded chemical solutions that were made in the laboratory in lieu of purchasing a commercial product. For example, excess (e.g., unused) Aldrin standard that was prepared in the laboratory (e.g., in methanol) would be disposed of as P004 waste if Aldrin was the sole-active ingredient (methanol is not "active" in this case). The P-list is not applied to waste standards with several active ingredients (e.g., a mixed pesticide standard), but only to waste standards with a sole-active ingredient. P-listed wastes are acutely hazardous wastes. To avoid generation of unnecessary quantities of P-listed waste, all P-listed waste should be segregated from other hazardous waste. Special attention will be paid to any wastes in this category since only 1 quart of a p-listed waste can be accumulated in a satellite accumulation area at any one time.  Also note that if a generator produces >1kg/month of P-listed waste they must register as a large quantity generator.  Containers that previously held P-listed wastes mus also be triple rinsed to meet RCRA empty standards. Currently there are no known  P-listed wasted generated on campus at Lincoln University.
·          U-List [40 CFR 261.33(f)] - The U-list applies to unused, discarded, commercial chemical products that contain a sole-active ingredient that appears on the U-list. In laboratories, the U-list is often assigned to expired chemicals or unused chemicals that are thought to be contaminated. For example, a container of methylene chloride, that for some reason is thought to be contaminated, would be disposed of as U080 waste. [Note: Actually dichloromethane, not its synonym methylene chloride appears on the U-list. When reviewing the P- and U-lists, one must carefully check for synonyms.] Unlike the P-list, which have been identified as acute hazardous wastes, the U-listed wastes have been identified as toxic wastes.